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May 29, 2020

Spend seven hours with the artist Jonathan Baldock – A Slow TV event presented by Kunsthall Stavanger

  • Jonathan Baldock in his studio. Photo: Rafal Zajko.

  • Detail Jonathan Baldock, 'Untitled', 2019. Hessian, felt, silk thread, glass, semi-precious stones, wool, polymer, 222 x 188cm (87 3/8 x 74 1/8in). Copyright Jonathan Baldock. Courtesy the artist and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London. Private Collection.

  • Jonathan Baldock, 'Untitled', 2019. Hessian, felt, silk thread, glass, semi-precious stones, wool, polymer, 222 x 188cm (87 3/8 x 74 1/8in). Copyright Jonathan Baldock. Courtesy the artist and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London. Private Collection.

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About


THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL JUNE 24.


Kunsthall Stavanger invites you to join us for a seven hour Slow TV marathon with artist Jonathan Baldock on June 24, starting at 10:00 am GMT.

The live stream, which will be available on Kunsthall Stavanger’s homepage, will show Baldock working on new large-scale textile works for his upcoming exhibition Me, Myself and I, at Kunsthall Stavanger – opening September 10 - November 8, 2020. Tune in and take part in this live experience to watch artworks in the making!

Slow TV gives us a unique experience; the feeling of being present in real time and space. The idea is that a journey or an activity is filmed as a whole and then aired unedited.

Slow TV was popularised in the 2000s by the Norwegian broadcaster NRK. Their first Slow TV broadcast “Bergensbanen”, featured every minute of the scenic train ride between Bergen on the Norwegian west coast, crossing the mountains to the capital of Oslo. Several Slow TV broadcasts have since followed, such as “Hurtigruten Minute by Minute” – a coastal voyage from Bergen to Kirkenes, and “National Knitting Night” - an eight-hour program of a sheep getting its wool cut, followed by a sweater being knit from that same wool.

Slow TV incidentally relates to Andy Warhol’s film Sleep from 1964, depicting stockbroker, poet and performance artist John Giorno sleeping for five hours and 21 minutes (though Warhol edited the film through duplicated sections to make it last longer).

With COVID-19 and its enforced quaranteens, we have all been forced to slow down. Jonathan Baldock’s exhibition was supposed to be on view May through July this year, but has been postponed to the fall. Therefore, we are featuring Baldock’s work in alternative ways this spring.


Jonathan Baldock (b. 1980, Kent, UK) works across multiple platforms including sculpture, installation and performance. He graduated from Winchester School of Art with a BA in Painting (2000-2003), followed by the Royal College of Art, London with an MA in Painting (2003-2005).

Baldock’s work is saturated with humour and wit, as well as an uncanny, macabre quality that channels his longstanding interest in myth, folklore and the narratives associated with 'outsider' practices. With work often taking on a biographical form, Baldock addresses the trauma, stress, sensuality, mortality and spirituality around our relationship to the body and the space it inhabits.

In the spring of 2019, Baldock had a solo exhibition at Camden Arts Centre, London, which toured to Tramway, Glasgow in August 2019 and will open at Bluecoat, Liverpool in March 2020.

Other notable solo and two-person exhibitions include those at De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill (2017); The Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool (2017); Southwark Park Galleries, London (2017); PEER, London (2016); Chapter Gallery, Cardiff (2016); Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridge (2013).

Baldock is represented by Stephen Friedman Gallery, London.


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